Dental Surgery and Oral Health Procedures

Click here for cost estimate for your Dogs Dental Procedure

Click here for cost estimate for your Cats Dental Procedure

Up to 85% of dogs and cats over the age of 6 have dental disease.  Dental disease is not “normal” in pets.  Dental tartar and halitosis is a source of infection in animals and is often very painful which can progress to tooth loss.  It is not possible to do a proper dental clean on animals unless they are under anaesthetic.  Animals need to have a full anaesthetic so we can ultrasonically scale the inside and outside of their teeth as well as beneath the gum line.  Simply removing the tartar on the outside of the teeth does the animal no good and is a waste of your money!

 

Some Common Questions and Answers

 

When should your pet have a dental cleaning? 

If there is visible tartar on the teeth then you should schedule a free dental check for your pet.  Brushing the teeth when tartar is present does not help the pet and in fact is often painful. 

Why does your pet have dental disease?  

Pets acquire dental disease from not brushing the teeth and not having the teeth professionally cleaned.  We brush our teeth every day and see a dentist regularly to prevent dental disease and the same steps are needed in pets as well.  Some breeds of dogs are especially prone to dental disease.

How do I prevent dental disease in my pet? 

Brushing the teeth EVERY DAY is the only way to prevent dental disease in pets as well as having the teeth cleaned by a veterinarian on a regular basis.  Using dental diets, sprays, sealers and wipes can help but not as much as brushing.  Feeding hard food or treats does not prevent dental disease.

What does a dental procedure involve? 

Your pet will have a physical exam, bloodwork if necessary and an intravenous catheter before anaesthetic is given.  The anaesthesia will be monitored and performed under the supervision of a veterinarian to decrease the risk of any complications.  The veterinarian will then clean and polish all of the teeth and evaluate each tooth.

How will my pet eat if several teeth are extracted? 

This is a concern for many clients, however removing diseased teeth is actually better for your pet.  No teeth is better than bad teeth!  In many cases, once the diseased teeth are removed the pet actually eats better because the pain and infection is gone!  Cats can get severe disease where the enamel of the teeth dissolve (FORL disease).  The best treatment for this disease is removal of most of the teeth to prevent pain.

My cat/dog still eats fine but the teeth look bad……is he/she in pain? 

Animals have a strong natural instinct to hide pain.  By the time they quit eating, the pain is more severe than the will to survive and eat.  Normal eating is not a reliable indicator of pain.  Ask your veterinarian to evaluate the mouth of your pet and demonstrate the pain and infection that is present.

Is my pet “too old” for a dental procedure? 

Pets are never too old to have pain and infection treated.  Most clients state a major change in their pet's behaviour after dental disease is appropriately treated. It is important to try to prevent dental disease from developing in your pet.  Brushing the teeth at home and having dental cleanings done when minimal tartar is present will prevent major oral surgery.  Unfortunately, many pets we see have severely diseased mouths that require more advanced, and costly, procedures.  Feel free to discuss your pets dental condition with one of our veterinarians so we can develop a treatment and prevention plan to allow your pet to have a pain and infection free mouth!

 

Dental Cleaning and Treatment Estimates

It is very difficult to give an accurate estimate for dental procedures, as we often do not know how many teeth are unhealthy and require treatment until we have your pet asleep and can use our dental instruments to evaluate.  We have a rough estimate based on commonly seen procedures.  But please be assured that our clinic strives to provide the highest level of care for your pet.  Below is what is involved in a dental cleaning for your beloved pet.  Your Veterinarian will inform you at the time of the examination (we offer free dental checks) what level your dog’s dental disease is.

 

Dog Estimates

 

Cost Estimate in below chart for Young dogs under 7 years (Extractions not included)

** Pre-anaesthetic bloodwork is not required and not included in these prices. If you wish to have blood work (it is always a good idea to check these) before surgery and evaluate organ function please add $140 to the below estimate.

Animal Weight

Mild

Moderate

Severe

Under 10 kg

$700

$750

$850

10-30 kg

$750

$800

$900

Over 30 kg

$800

$850

$950

 

Cost Estimate in below chart for Older dogs over 7 years (Extractions not included)

For dogs over 7, pre-anaesthetic blood work is required and therefore included in below estimate prices.

Animal Weight

Mild

Moderate

Severe

Under 10 kg

$850

$900

$1000

10-30 kg

$900

$950

$1050

Over 30 kg

$950

$1000

$1100

 

Dog Extractions Costs

Exact costs for extraction are in addition to the above prices and can only be determined at the time of the dental.

Costs are based on per tooth and time it takes for each extraction.

Mild extraction = $45 per tooth (Small incisors or extremely rotten, falling out teeth)

Moderate Extraction = $65 per tooth (Moderate sized teeth)

Severe Extraction = $120 per tooth (Large difficult teeth e.g. canines or carnasal teeth)

 

Cat Estimates

 

Cost Estimate in below chart for Young cats under 7 years (Extractions not included)

** Pre-anaesthetic bloodwork is not required and not included in these prices. If you wish to have blood work (it is always a good idea to check these) before surgery and evaluate organ function please add $140 to the below estimate.

Animal Weight

Mild

Moderate

Severe

Under 10 kg

$520

$570

$670

 

Cost Estimate in below chart for Older cats over 7 years (Extractions not included)

For cats over 7, pre-anaesthetic blood work is required and therefore included in below estimate prices.

Animal Weight

Mild

Moderate

Severe

Under 10 kg

$660

$710

$810

 

Cat Extractions Costs

Exact costs for extraction are in addition to the above prices and can only be determined at the time of the dental.

Costs are based on per tooth and time it takes for each extraction.

Mild extraction = $25 per tooth (Small incisors or extremely rotten, falling out teeth)

Moderate Extraction = $45 per tooth (Moderate sized teeth)

Severe Extraction = $75 per tooth (Large difficult teeth e.g. canines or carnasal teeth)

 

Products and Services included with every Dental Surgery for Dogs and Cats

Pre-anaesthetic testing - Includes doctor’s exam and bloodwork to evaluate organ function, electrolytes and blood counts.  Required on older pets but recommended for younger pets.

Anaesthesia - Includes pre-anaesthetic sedative/pain injection, anaesthetic induction, intubation, oxygen and anaesthetic gas delivery.

Anaesthesia Monitoring - All pets are monitored from the beginning under the supervision of a qualified veterinarian, using vital parameter monitoring equipment.  Patients undergoing dental procedures are also given thermal support with warm air circulating blankets. 

Intravenous surgical fluid - IV fluids support the blood pressure and allow access to a vein for emergencies if needed.  IV fluids are required for all dental procedures.

Pain Management - Patients receive appropriate pain management including injections prior to and during surgery.

Dental cleaning/assessment/treatment - Dental cleanings are done by a veterinarian using an ultrasonic scaler as well as hand scaling beneath the gum line on all surfaces of all teeth.  The pocket between the tooth and gum is measured and the health of each tooth is assessed.

Take home medication - Some patients need medication such as antibiotics to take home. These costs are included in the price. 

 

Products and Services not included with Dental Surgery

Dental extractions - Although every effort is made to salvage teeth, removing unhealthy teeth that cannot be saved is best for the health of the pet.  Unfortunately we cannot determine which teeth need extraction until the pet is under anaesthesia and the tooth is evaluated thoroughly.  The cost is dependent upon the number of teeth that need extraction and the complexity of the extraction required. After teeth are surgically extracted, the gingival/gum tissues are sutured closed to prevent infection, aid in proper healing, and improve the comfort of the pet.

Thank you for entrusting the care of your pet to the Maraboon Veterinary Surgery. We offer advanced dental procedures to return your pet's mouth to a health condition so they can live without oral pain and infection. Feel free to discuss your pet's care with us at any time.